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How Jack Layton’s legacy lives on

How Jack Layton’s legacy lives on

Posted inPolitics

CA



by
Olivia Chow

August 22 marks 11 years since Canada lost Jack Layton. What better way to honour him than with a fellowship to foster social change?

A graphic featuring Olivia Chow

Jack Layton led by example, demonstrating that social and economic justice is possible when we work together. August 22 marks 11 years since Canada lost Jack. What better way to honour him than with a fellowship to foster social change?

In Jack’s memory, rabble, the Institute for Change Leaders, and the Douglas Coldwell Layton Foundation are proud to launch the fifth annual Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship. The fellowship supports emerging journalists who are particularly interested in covering social change and reporting on underrepresented progressive stories.

Why we need the Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship

Social change reporting is a rarity in Canada. The Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship is an exciting opportunity to strengthen media democracy while affording excellent mentorship for new voices in the Canadian media landscape

Over the past five years, each of the Jack Layton Journalism for Change fellows has amplified underrepresented voices through their bodies of work. Their journalism has tackled themes such as systemic racial and economic inequality, the policing system in Canada, and the vital role that public libraries play in strengthening social justice measures.

How to honour Jack Layton

To support a new generation of journalists — and carry on Jack’s legacy — please consider making a donation to this fund today. This unique fellowship is only possible through community support, with generosity from individuals just like you. 

As an organization, you can remember Jack by becoming a sponsor. To join the ranks of this fellowship’s founding supporters, including UNIFOR, USW District 6 and CUPE Ontario, please contact [email protected] to discuss opportunities. 

If you are an emerging journalist living in Canada, please apply to this fellowship before midnight on September 23, 2022. We hope to hear from applicants who feel underrepresented in traditional media outlets and are looking to develop their voices. We encourage journalists of all different experience levels, ages, races, genders, abilities, and walks of life to apply. As Jack would say, “Don’t let them tell you it can’t be done.” 

Whether you’re a journalist, a supporter or a rabble reader, thank you for remembering Jack. We are proud to preserve his outstanding contributions through the Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship. His legacy lives on through your generosity and commitment to advancing social change in Canada. 

What previous fellows are saying

“As a young woman of colour, I rarely find room for these stories in mainstream media. Racism in the criminal justice system is a complex issue that deserves thorough research and reporting. As the 2020 fellow, I look forward to further exploring these issues, while shining a light on how Black Canadians in conflict with the law are treated in our criminal justice system.”

— Lidia Abraha, former fellow

“Within our current media landscape, opportunities for social change reporting are rare, and opportunities for mentorship are even rarer. The Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship is a unique merger of the two, a chance for an emerging journalist to pursue the stories about economic, environmental and social justice under the guidance of rabble’s passionate and talented editorial staff. Above all, the Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship is a call to action; it is a reminder of the urgent need to speak truth to power during these difficult times.”

— Phillip Dwight Morgan, former fellow

“Fellowships like this are important because it allows you to expand on topics that aren’t otherwise covered in the media. The Jack Layton Journalism for Change Fellowship gave me even more motivation to continue exploring and digging deeper bringing justice to those communities I was reporting on, giving voice to those who didn’t have a platform.”

— Olivia Robinson, former fellow

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